LVMH hires ex-Apple executive Ian Rogers for digital officer role

Former Apple executive Ian Rogers has joined LVMH as Chief Digital Officer as the group looks to improve its digital ecosystem

 
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Ian Rogers, the new Chief Digital Officer of Apple, speaks at an event. His recruitment signals LVMH's desire to improve its digital prowess
Ian Rogers, the new Chief Digital Officer of LVMH, speaks at an event. The recruitment of the ex-Apple executive signals his new company's desire to improve its digital prowess
Ian Rogers, the new Chief Digital Officer of LVMH, speaks at an event. The recruitment of the ex-Apple executive signals his new company’s desire to improve its digital prowess

LVMH’s latest appointment proves that luxury is finally beginning to take note of digital, as Ian Rogers, formerly of Apple, takes to the position of Chief Digital Officer. The computer science graduate made headlines days earlier after leaving his former employer, where he recently headed the development of Beats1 radio. On his departure, he said only that he was leaving for Europe. However, it’s clear now that Rogers will head up the digital side of the luxury powerhouse and play an instrumental role in the industry’s changing relationship with digital.

[I]t’s clear now that Rogers will head up the digital side of the luxury powerhouse

“I am happy to welcome Ian into our Group to strengthen our digital ecosystem,” said Bernard Arnault, Chairman and Chief Executive of LVMH. “He will build on the foundations laid by Thomas Romieu, takes the Houses to the next level and explore new opportunities for the Group in the digital sphere. Ian will bring his extensive experience in high-end digital ventures and his innovation-driven spirit to develop LVMH leadership pin the digital luxury field.”

Rogers’ experience in the digital music business should hand him an advantage as he looks to lead LVMH in a time where luxury’s high-end hostilities are beginning to wane.

A recent McKinsey report shows that half of all luxury purchasing decisions are influenced by the digital experience, although 40 percent of luxury brands still choose not to sell their goods online, according to Bain. Worse is that online sales are rising at a rate of around 20 to 30 percent in a period where luxury sales overall are growing at a much lesser five percent.